Rain Garden at Cressingham Gardens Estate

Yesterday, I went along to see work begin on what will be Lambeth’s biggest rain garden.

Currently, water from three downpipes on the estate runs on to a grassed area and then makes its way down and out on to Tulse Hill. During heavy rainfall, a significant amount of water flows down to the road. The garden will help to reduce this by retaining the water and allowing it to slowly soak into the soil.

How does a rain garden work?

A diagram of the planned gardens at Cressingham Gardens.

Cressingham - cut through

The first day

Raingarden1

1. We started by marking out the areas for digging. There are three sections and each sits directly under a downpipe.

Raingarden2

2. We then carefully removed the turf and placed this to one side to be used later on the berms, or garden walls.

Raingarden3

3. Once all the turf had been removed, the hard work really started and we began digging out the gardens. We removed a lot of clay which will have added to the current drainage problems. The remaining earth will be mixed with compost to improve drainage and placed back into garden over a layer of gravel.

Despite the very best efforts of staff and volunteers, we didn’t manage to dig out all of the gardens in one day. Work will continue at a later date and a planting session (which will be rather less strenuous!) will be arranged in the near future.

If you would like to get involved in future sessions, please contact Helen Spring at the Lost Effra Project hspring@wildlondon.org.uk.

We’ll keep you up to date with this project and really look forward to seeing the finished gardens.

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One Response to Rain Garden at Cressingham Gardens Estate

  1. […] initiatives are numerous, with projects underway in boroughs across London. LWT members created the Cressingham Rain Gardens, a ‘green corridor’ consisting of three connected gardens designed to support habitat for birds […]

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